Mold and Cancer Can Mold Cause Cancer
January 19, 2022

Indoor exposure to black mold, or any other mold, has not been linked to cancer. However, mold is linked to various other health issues.

Mold can grow anywhere where moisture is found. Mold spores fly through the air to enter homes and other structures, and as a result, we may breathe them in at times. This can aggravate allergies and asthma and induce upper respiratory symptoms when present in high quantities for a long time in our bodies.

Read on to learn more about black mold, different varieties of mold, and who are most vulnerable to them.

Types of Dangerous Mold and Their Relation to Cancer

There are several dangerous and toxic molds found in our surroundings. Two of them are regarded as extremely dangerous and related to cancer.

Black mold and cancer

Stachybotrys chartarum, often known as black mold, or Stachybotrys atra, has a reputation for being a toxic mold. Satratoxin, a form of mycotoxin produced by black mold, is a toxic chemical that can cause disease in some people, but black mold and lung cancer haven’t been linked to it yet.

Aspergillus and cancer

Molds in this category produce aflatoxins, which are toxic components that can make you feel very ill and lead to liver cancer if you ingest them too much. Rather than inhaling, this mold enters your body through digestion.

Mold can grow in a variety of places, including your home. Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Alternaria are other dangerous molds found.

Also read: MYCOTOXINS TOXICITY: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Mold Toxicity Symptoms

The adverse effects of short-term mold exposure are different for every person. If you’re allergic or sensitive to mold, you’re more likely to experience severe symptoms.

Symptoms in general include:

  • sinus and nasal congestion
  • nasal irritation
  • itchy, watery eyes
  • red eyes
  • blurry vision
  • trouble breathing
  • coughing
  • sore throat
  • sneezing
  • nosebleeds
  • asthma attacks (if you have asthma)

What Are the Risks of Mold Exposure?

Some people are completely unaffected, while others are more sensitive. If you have a mold allergy, you may experience severe symptoms such as lung inflammation.

According to the CDC, the Institute of Medicine found sufficient evidence associating indoor mold and wet indoor settings in general, with:

  • Symptoms of the upper respiratory tract in healthy adults
  • Symptoms in people suffering from asthma
  • Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in vulnerable people

Furthermore, lung cavities can be infected with Aspergillus niger if you have emphysema, TB, or severe sarcoidosis. Invasive aspergillosis is a more serious reaction in which the infection spreads from the lungs to the brain, heart, and kidneys. This is more likely to happen in persons with a weaker immune system.

What Type of Cancer Does Mold Cause?

Aflatoxin is a toxin produced by some varieties of this mold that can make you sick and even cause liver cancer. That usually comes from eating it rather than breathing it in.

Who’s at Risk?

People with the following conditions are at the biggest risk:

  • allergies
  • asthma
  • a chronic lung disease
  • cancer treatment
  • intaking strong drugs and medicines
  • organ or stem cell transplant

Also read: MOLD ON FOOD: IS MOLDY FOOD DANGEROUS?

How Do You Keep Mold Out of Buildings and Home?

Mold growth can be slowed down in your home and building by performing the following:

  • Controlling humidity levels.
  • Repair the leaking roofs, windows, and pipes as quickly as possible.
  • Thoroughly cleaning and drying after floods.
  • Ventilating shower, laundry, and cooking facilities.

Call us at 843-572-1600 or make an appointment with one of our mold toxicity expert doctors now if you are seeking the best mold treatment near you. We have a team of professionals at the Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine who can help you with all of your health-related issues.

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Household mold is more than just an eyesore, whether it’s the slippery black spots on your shower curtain, the fuzzy white patches on your basement floor, or the smooth orange film that accumulates on your kitchen drain. You may have health issues that could have been triggered by mold regardless of whether you are allergic or not. Here’s what you need to know about mold and dampness and how to protect yourself and your house.

What is Mold?

Mold is a form of fungus composed of microscopic organisms found practically everywhere. Molds perform a crucial function in nature by decomposing dead leaves, plants, and trees.

How Does Mold Grow?

Mold reproduces by producing tiny spores. They thrive in damp conditions and reproduce by dispersion through the air and water. For energy, they rely on organic matter.

What Can Mold Grow On and How Common Is Mold in Buildings?

Mold tends to grow on paper, cardboard, ceiling tiles, and wood products. Mold may develop in dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation, drywall, carpet, cloth, and upholstery, among other things. As a result, they are highly frequent in buildings and residences.

Also read: Mold On Food: Is Moldy Food Dangerous?

How Does Mold Affect the Surfaces It Grows On?

Mold consumes the materials it grows on, causing those materials to be damaged or deteriorate. Mold may cause aesthetic damage, including discoloration, unpleasant smells, and even structural degeneration of surfaces if left unchecked.

Can You Get Fungal Pneumonia from Mold?

Aspergillus, a mold present in many indoor and outdoor habitats, is one of the most common airborne fungi. Aspergillosis, the resultant illness, frequently affects patients with severe immunodeficiency.

What Types of Mold are on Exterior Surfaces?

It’s very difficult to identify the type of mold, but some of the most common ones are;

  • Aspergillus – Found almost everywhere.
  • Penicillium – Found in vinyl, paneling, wood, painted masonry, and poured concrete foundations.
  • Cladosporium – Found on external surfaces like vinyl siding, glass surfaces, windows, many types of wood, and paneling.
  • Trichoderma – Found in untreated lumber, pinewood and boards, decaying wood, and textiles.

How does Mold Affect Your Health?

Molds create allergens (compounds capable of causing an allergic reaction), irritants, and, in certain cases, poisonous substances. Mold spores can produce allergic reactions such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash if inhaled or touched. Molds can also trigger asthma episodes.

Also read: OSTEOPOROSIS: SYMPTOMS, CAUSES, PREVENTION & TREATMENT

Mold Reactions: Who’s at Risk?

Allergy sufferers may be more vulnerable to mold. Fungal infections are more common in people with a weakened immune system or underlying lung disease. People with chronic respiratory illnesses may have trouble breathing when mold is present.

How Can You Keep Mold Out of Buildings and Homes?

    You can control the development of mold by following these points:

  • Regulating humidity levels;
  • Repairing leaking roofs, windows, and pipes as soon as possible;
  • After floods, thoroughly clean and dry the area;
  • Shower, laundry, and culinary spaces to be ventilated.

If you are looking for an expert on mold illnesses and mold poisoning treatment near you, call us at 843-572-1600 or schedule an appointment today. At the Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, we have a team of professionals who have solutions for all your health-related problems.

2 December 9, 2019

dangers of black mold exposure

Mold is a kind of fungus that is present nearly everywhere. Generally, reasonable quantities of mold in the environment are harmless to people with a well-functioning immune system. However, some people can be very sensitive to mold spores and may develop respiratory problems when inhaling even a small number of spores.