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Household mold is more than just an eyesore, whether it’s the slippery black spots on your shower curtain, the fuzzy white patches on your basement floor, or the smooth orange film that accumulates on your kitchen drain. You may have health issues that could have been triggered by mold regardless of whether you are allergic or not. Here’s what you need to know about mold and dampness and how to protect yourself and your house.

What is Mold?

Mold is a form of fungus composed of microscopic organisms found practically everywhere. Molds perform a crucial function in nature by decomposing dead leaves, plants, and trees.

How Does Mold Grow?

Mold reproduces by producing tiny spores. They thrive in damp conditions and reproduce by dispersion through the air and water. For energy, they rely on organic matter.

What Can Mold Grow On and How Common Is Mold in Buildings?

Mold tends to grow on paper, cardboard, ceiling tiles, and wood products. Mold may develop in dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation, drywall, carpet, cloth, and upholstery, among other things. As a result, they are highly frequent in buildings and residences.

Also read: Mold On Food: Is Moldy Food Dangerous?

How Does Mold Affect the Surfaces It Grows On?

Mold consumes the materials it grows on, causing those materials to be damaged or deteriorate. Mold may cause aesthetic damage, including discoloration, unpleasant smells, and even structural degeneration of surfaces if left unchecked.

Can You Get Fungal Pneumonia from Mold?

Aspergillus, a mold present in many indoor and outdoor habitats, is one of the most common airborne fungi. Aspergillosis, the resultant illness, frequently affects patients with severe immunodeficiency.

What Types of Mold are on Exterior Surfaces?

It’s very difficult to identify the type of mold, but some of the most common ones are;

  • Aspergillus – Found almost everywhere.
  • Penicillium – Found in vinyl, paneling, wood, painted masonry, and poured concrete foundations.
  • Cladosporium – Found on external surfaces like vinyl siding, glass surfaces, windows, many types of wood, and paneling.
  • Trichoderma – Found in untreated lumber, pinewood and boards, decaying wood, and textiles.

How does Mold Affect Your Health?

Molds create allergens (compounds capable of causing an allergic reaction), irritants, and, in certain cases, poisonous substances. Mold spores can produce allergic reactions such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash if inhaled or touched. Molds can also trigger asthma episodes.

Also read: OSTEOPOROSIS: SYMPTOMS, CAUSES, PREVENTION & TREATMENT

Mold Reactions: Who’s at Risk?

Allergy sufferers may be more vulnerable to mold. Fungal infections are more common in people with a weakened immune system or underlying lung disease. People with chronic respiratory illnesses may have trouble breathing when mold is present.

How Can You Keep Mold Out of Buildings and Homes?

    You can control the development of mold by following these points:

  • Regulating humidity levels;
  • Repairing leaking roofs, windows, and pipes as soon as possible;
  • After floods, thoroughly clean and dry the area;
  • Shower, laundry, and culinary spaces to be ventilated.

If you are looking for an expert on mold illnesses and mold poisoning treatment near you, call us at 843-572-1600 or schedule an appointment today. At the Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, we have a team of professionals who have solutions for all your health-related problems.