Breast Health & Thermography

Breast Health and Thermography as an Adjunct Screening Tool

After many years of working alone in providing medical care to our female patients, The Center for Women’s Health at COEM has finally achieved its goal. We are now part of a network offering comprehensive medical care for preventing, diagnosing and treating breast cancer.

From the very first breast thermogram that we performed back in March, 2003 until today we have worked with professionals who are experts at reading thermograms and interpreting their results. This should give you confidence that your breast studies have been and continue to be read by the most experienced in this field. Always remember that Mammography is considered the primary diagnostic tool for identifying breast cancer. Thermography is useful as an adjunct procedure.

If a breast thermography is interpreted as a TH3, TH4 or TH5 we now have the services for comprehensive imaging utilizing ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dr.’s Goltra and Clinton and their staff have been outstanding in working with the special needs of our patients. Dr. James Majeski has joined our team to provide the services as a breast specialist along with surgical intervention if needed. A review of his credentials will assure you that you are in the hands of a truly outstanding doctor. We are hearing wonderful reports from our patients who have consulted with him. They are appreciative of his skills and compassion.

As the greatest death rate from breast cancer occurs between the ages of 40-45 years and these cancers on average began 15 years before, early detection becomes critical beginning as early as age 25. Breast Thermography can be used as an adjunct procedure to Mammography WITHOUT radiation or compression. Thermography, can be highly sensitive and specific.

Using nutritional and immunologic treatment protocols we have been able to reverse even a TH4 (65% plus risk of confirming malignancy) to a normal TH1 and TH2 rating. Prevention is a better way to manage a disease that affects one in eight women. See the images for yourself.

Patient A: had her first thermogram performed on January 2004 (shown on the left). After beginning a preventive treatment protocol, she was rescanned on December 2005, showing marked improvement.

Patient B: also showed great improvement with a nutritional and immunological treatment protocol, as demonstrated in her before and after thermograms between November 2006 and October 2007.

Contact the Center for Women’s Health at COEM today by calling (843) 572-1600 or by visiting our web site at www.earlycancerdetection.com

Allan Lieberman, M.D., F.A.A.E.M.
Medical Director,
The Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine

 

 

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